Part IV: The Dirty Dozen Skills, Abilities, and Attributes of Successful Health and Patient Advocates and Care Managers

Posted by:

And, finally, the fourth and last in our series of skills, abilities and attributes that all successful advocates and care managers must.

We’re wrapping up with 3 additional concepts that are important to the success all private advocacy and care management practices.  Yes – I know the total will be 16 (and we promised only a dirty dozen!) – see Part I about my inability to count 🙂 )

Which of these describe you and your abilities?  Which of them do not?  Where do you go from here?

Do your own assessment! 

 

14.  Never forget  your Allegiance. Allegiance is the foundation of a private, independent advocate’s or care manager’s work; that is – because the patient or caregiver (or someone else whose sole allegiance is to the patient) hires you, your entire focus is on what’s best for him or her.

That is the one major distinction between private, independent professionals and those who work for an organization that profits from the healthcare system. Hospital advocates, insurance advocates – their allegiance is to the companies and systems they work for. While their hearts may be in the right place, and patients may THINK they are being helped, these system-paid advocates are too often, even frustrating to them, unable to offer the best help.

Continue Reading →

1

“Health Advocate” vs “Patient Advocate”: 7 Reasons the Debate Is a Waste of Time

Posted by:

Although you may not realize it, there is a debate raging about titles in advocacy. 

I chose this topic today not because I have an opinion on THE right title; rather because I think the debate is a waste of time, and is a distraction from the more important work of helping people understand how advocates and care managers can help them.

The debate is this:  Should we be called Health Advocates?  Or should we be called Patient Advocates?

It might surprise you to know that some people not only have very definite opinions on the answer to that question, but that they argue the point for hours at a time. In my (not so) humble opinion, for every hour they argue, they could instead have promoted advocacy and the many benefits to working with an advocate – no matter what he or she is called.

Here are the reasons I think this argument is a waste of time:

Continue Reading →

2

What the Presidential Election Results Mean for Patient Advocates

Posted by:

When President Barack Obama ran for office in 2008, healthcare reform was already an enormous and contentious topic.

In those days, I was invited to speak to dozens of groups of patients and caregivers to help audiences sort out the issues that comprised healthcare reform so they could, on their own, decide which aspects (if any) were important to them. From the concept of “universal” healthcare through a public option, to coverage for pre-existing conditions, to portability, tort reform, free vaccinations to develop “herd immunity,” and many more, we looked at the whole of the topic as objectively as possible.

Before I started each talk, I would challenge audiences to figure out which side I was on by the time we were finished – reform? or no reform? It gave me great satisfaction that a show of hands at the end usually resulted in about a 50-50 split, demonstrating as much neutrality as I had been able to muster. It was somewhat surprising, because I was very much in favor of reform and truly not objective about the subject at all.

What I never mentioned to any of my audiences was this: that the bottom line for patient advocates was that healthcare reform was, simply, job security.

The reason: no matter what became of healthcare reform (and, of course, history tells us it became Obamacare, AKA the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or the ACA) – no matter what decisions became the law of the land, Americans were going to be confused by it all. They would be confused about costs, access, costs, access, access, and of course, costs, all of which could have huge detrimental effects on their health and care.

The more confused they became, the more they would need a health or patient advocate to help out.

Thus, job security.

That brings us to the 2016 presidential race, and victory for the candidate who said he will work to repeal the ACA.

No matter what your feelings about the outcome of last week’s presidential election, there are a few things advocates can take to the bank:

  • The healthcare system will go into further upheaval as the ACA is dismantled.
  • Patients and caregivers will find themselves more confused and frustrated than they have ever been.
  • The moneymakers in the system will seek new ways to maintain and grow their own profits, shifting and being shifty, making it even more difficult for patients to get the care they need at a cost they can afford.
  • The demand for private, independent advocates will grow – even more – and there won’t be enough advocates to help the patients and caregivers who need them.
  • Yes – all this adds up to even more job security.

We can’t anticipate exactly what changes will be made, but that doesn’t really matter. People are scared and confused now – today – because they just don’t know what to expect. They didn’t know before the election and they feel even less in control now. Even through the ACA, pricing has gone up in most states, and people feel like they are getting less and less for their money. Their confusion and frustration (and anger) is going from bad to worse.

They need help. They want help.

If you are absolutely serious about growing a successful advocacy practice, then NOW is the time to prepare. There will be no better time in history to establish your practice (if you haven’t already) and to expand it (if you’re already in business.)

Here’s how.

If you are just getting started:

If you’ve been in business for awhile:

For all professional advocates:

riper

What are you waiting for?

LEARN ABOUT APHA MEMBERSHIP | FIND MORE REASONS PATIENTS NEED ADVOCATES

2

Mixed Messages Are Just a Lawsuit Waiting to Happen

Posted by:

A few weeks ago, I wrote Fool Me Once, Shame on You, But Fool Me Twice about the problems that can hurt patient-clients which also hurt our profession because they violate our ethical principles and best practices.  Those problems range from advocates working beyond their own abilities to help clients because they may not have the experience or education to do so, to selling medical products on their websites, and others.

Today we’re looking at the promised Example #2 of this problem in hopes of a hard stop. That problem: the danger of mixed messages.

As stated in the Fool Me Once post,

I fully expect that some of you will be appalled, possibly upset with me, because you’ve not thought of these as violations or misrepresentations. Some of you innocently don’t realize these transgressions; but now, as of reading this post, you are on notice…. please look at this not as judgment, but as a time for correction.

Mixed Messages

Sometimes our words and behavior – vs – what we as private patient advocates can do ethically, even legally, are in conflict. Sometimes subtle, sometimes more blatant, it’s those mixed messages that will cause an advocate to be sued one day and, frankly, it will be his or her own fault because it is easily preventable. Further, when that advocate is sued, his or her liability insurance, which is purchased specifically to pay for legal assistance, will look at these mixed messages and refuse to provide that cost support for legal needs.

What’s that lawsuit-provoking mixed message? 

Continue Reading →

1

Celebrating our 6th Annual Private Professional Patient Advocates Week

Posted by:

This week, March 20 to 26, 2016 marks our 6th Annual Private Professional Patient Advocates Week, and as predicted last year, yes – our profession is growing marvelously!

Last year we did a recap of the history of the profession.  This year we’re going to provide some updates and some food for thought.

Continue Reading →

0

Fool Me Once, Shame on You, But Fool Me Twice….

Posted by:

From bold-faced lies to misrepresentation – facts that aren’t facts, withholding information, skirting the code of ethics, and shades of truth – honesty and the advocacy business have been on my mind. I’m eager to hear your opinion on the subject, too.

My thought process was actually triggered by something that has nothing to do with advocacy at all, something that seems relatively innocuous, but then, maybe not-so-innocuous at all: the purchase of a 5-lb bag of sugar to bake holiday cookies last December.  Now a 5-lb bag of sugar has always been a 5-lb bag of sugar and has yielded a certain number of batches of cookies. I’ve been buying 5-lb bags of sugar all my baking life, so I grabbed the bag off the shelf at the store as I do every December, knowing that cookie baking was in my near future.

Except that this time, that 5-lb bag of sugar was (you guessed it) only 4 lbs!  It didn’t cost any less, but it had 20% less sugar in the bag. Yes, it was labeled correctly, and no, I had not read it carefully enough. But that is SO FAR beside the point. Old habits die hard.

So now?  I will never trust that store again when it comes to purchasing sugar – or anything else that I have trusted to be of a certain size. Sugar isn’t the only problem. Many other kinds of foods, including cereal, frozen vegetables, orange juice, pre-packaged produce and meats. A pound is still a pound, but a package that has always been a certain size is rarely that size anymore. Fool us all! That cummupence got me to thinking about other places in life where things are not what they seem to be. For example – the healthcare system. For people of a certain age or older, the healthcare system was always accessible and available, provided what we needed when we needed it, through kindly and knowledgeable providers, and at an affordable price (or no cost at all.)

But now, in 2016, that healthcare system no longer exists – not in the US anyway. Period. No patient accessing the American healthcare system can trust any portion of it anymore. We expect 5 lbs of sweet care, and we’re not getting it…

We’ve been fooled once, twice – and now it seems – will continue to be fooled forever…

… which is why people need patient advocates. So, in a way, that “Fool Me Once” led to a new profession in which we are all keenly interested. While we love the work we do, it is sad, in a way, to think about why we are called upon to do it.  People can’t trust the system, so they hire us to reclaim the honesty.

My thought process then turned to patient advocates ourselves, and the foundation upon which we are building our profession. Recently I have had conversations with advocates that suggest to me that our foundation is being chipped away at by some practicing advocates. Among us are people who are, sometimes innocently (sometimes not-so-innocently) violating the honesty, ethical standards, and expectations our profession demands, even if we have no formal way to demand them yet.

And that’s a problem. We’re very new, and we have only one chance to make that positive, ethical, above-reproach first impression. When some advocates aren’t on board with that approach, it becomes a problem for the entire group of us – those of us who are trying to right the healthcare system wrongs described above.

I’m going to provide two examples – one this week, and one soon – and some of you will see yourselves. I fully expect that some of you will be appalled, possibly upset with me, because you’ve not thought of these as violations or misrepresentations. Some of you innocently don’t realize these transgressions; but now, as of reading this post, you are on notice – now you will. 

Whether or not you’ve violated your ethics intentionally or innocently, please look at this not as judgment, but as a time for correction. Continue Reading →

4

How to Overcome the Biggest Challenge in Patient Advocacy Today

Posted by:

A few weeks ago at the WASHAA Annual Meeting (Washington State Health Advocacy Association) I was asked my opinion on the biggest challenges in patient advocacy as we turn the corner to 2016.

I didn’t hesitate with my answer. I know exactly what those huge challenges are. So I shared my answer, which I’ll also share with you in a minute.

As an individual, your answers might be slightly different from the ones I see. You might consider your biggest challenges to be recognition of the profession by potential clients, the ability to get people to pay for your services, the juggling of business as well as your advocacy work, time management – or many others. (What DO you think are your biggest challenges?  Please comment to let us know.)

Continue Reading →

2
Page 1 of 3 123