Whinery – How to Make Your Fortune

Posted by:

Maybe you’ve heard that old joke:

Know how to start a winery and make a small fortune?
… Start with a large fortune.

On my recent visit to California, I was reminded of that joke. I was teaching APHA Workshops in San Diego and it came up twice:  first because one of our attendees brought me a bottle of wine from her northern California neighborhood (thanks MR – delicious!) and second….

Because we followed the money to improve attendees’ chances for success – great success! – as private, independent health and patient advocates… amidst some “whining” – because it’s a topic very few like to think about.

Here’s why and how:

Continue Reading →

0

Whack-a-Mole and the Zen of the Caterpillar That Became Lunch

Posted by:

Tuesday was a whack-a-mole day. One thing would go wrong, I would begin to fix it, only to find something else needed fixing, too. Details with new bank accounts (have you tried opening a new business bank account lately?), an incorrect tax bill from the city where I now live and do business, hiccups with our new phone system, and myriad technical problems with the ongoing redesign and redevelopment of the APHA membership website… 

Yes, whack-a-mole.

But Wednesday and Thursday, two experiences combined to give me new perspective, one I’ll share with you in hopes it will help you weather those whack-a-mole days when you need a new perspective, too.

Continue Reading →

2

Survey Says! The Results Are In

Posted by:

We privately paid, independent, professional patient advocates “tend to be older, white, female, more highly educated, and have other medical training or past careers in related professions.”

…. or at least that is one conclusion drawn by the surveyors — those who built, issued and analyzed the first National Health and Patient Advocate Survey.*

Both private, self-employed advocates, and employed advocates (hospitals, insurers, employers), were surveyed. Whether or not you were one of the folks who took the survey, if you have any interest in patient or health advocacy as a profession, you’ll be interested in the results.  They were issued June 30 – you can download the report from here.

But that’s not the best news from the results… The best news is…

(drumroll please!)

Continue Reading →

0

Fool Me Once, Shame on You, But Fool Me Twice….

Posted by:

From bold-faced lies to misrepresentation – facts that aren’t facts, withholding information, skirting the code of ethics, and shades of truth – honesty and the advocacy business have been on my mind. I’m eager to hear your opinion on the subject, too.

My thought process was actually triggered by something that has nothing to do with advocacy at all, something that seems relatively innocuous, but then, maybe not-so-innocuous at all: the purchase of a 5-lb bag of sugar to bake holiday cookies last December.  Now a 5-lb bag of sugar has always been a 5-lb bag of sugar and has yielded a certain number of batches of cookies. I’ve been buying 5-lb bags of sugar all my baking life, so I grabbed the bag off the shelf at the store as I do every December, knowing that cookie baking was in my near future.

Except that this time, that 5-lb bag of sugar was (you guessed it) only 4 lbs!  It didn’t cost any less, but it had 20% less sugar in the bag. Yes, it was labeled correctly, and no, I had not read it carefully enough. But that is SO FAR beside the point. Old habits die hard.

So now?  I will never trust that store again when it comes to purchasing sugar – or anything else that I have trusted to be of a certain size. Sugar isn’t the only problem. Many other kinds of foods, including cereal, frozen vegetables, orange juice, pre-packaged produce and meats. A pound is still a pound, but a package that has always been a certain size is rarely that size anymore. Fool us all! That cummupence got me to thinking about other places in life where things are not what they seem to be. For example – the healthcare system. For people of a certain age or older, the healthcare system was always accessible and available, provided what we needed when we needed it, through kindly and knowledgeable providers, and at an affordable price (or no cost at all.)

But now, in 2016, that healthcare system no longer exists – not in the US anyway. Period. No patient accessing the American healthcare system can trust any portion of it anymore. We expect 5 lbs of sweet care, and we’re not getting it…

We’ve been fooled once, twice – and now it seems – will continue to be fooled forever…

… which is why people need patient advocates. So, in a way, that “Fool Me Once” led to a new profession in which we are all keenly interested. While we love the work we do, it is sad, in a way, to think about why we are called upon to do it.  People can’t trust the system, so they hire us to reclaim the honesty.

My thought process then turned to patient advocates ourselves, and the foundation upon which we are building our profession. Recently I have had conversations with advocates that suggest to me that our foundation is being chipped away at by some practicing advocates. Among us are people who are, sometimes innocently (sometimes not-so-innocently) violating the honesty, ethical standards, and expectations our profession demands, even if we have no formal way to demand them yet.

And that’s a problem. We’re very new, and we have only one chance to make that positive, ethical, above-reproach first impression. When some advocates aren’t on board with that approach, it becomes a problem for the entire group of us – those of us who are trying to right the healthcare system wrongs described above.

I’m going to provide two examples – one this week, and one soon – and some of you will see yourselves. I fully expect that some of you will be appalled, possibly upset with me, because you’ve not thought of these as violations or misrepresentations. Some of you innocently don’t realize these transgressions; but now, as of reading this post, you are on notice – now you will. 

Whether or not you’ve violated your ethics intentionally or innocently, please look at this not as judgment, but as a time for correction. Continue Reading →

4

Revisiting the Case of Farid Fata – Why Patient Advocates Must Take Notice

Posted by:

In July 2015, we took a look at the case of Farid Fata, the Michigan oncologist who is now in prison on fraud charges because he diagnosed and treated more than 500 people for cancer they didn’t have, many of whom died.

Yes – you read that right.  You read the part about treating more than 500 people for cancer they didn’t have.  And, I hope you caught the part that he is in prison on FRAUD charges – not murder, not manslaughter – nothing that recognizes the horrible physical condition he left those patients in after aggressive chemo and radiation. Whatever he could make money from, that’s what he did, and that’s why he is in prison.

See:  A Second Opinion Isn’t Good Enough

Shortly after publishing the post about second opinions, I wrote about how, if any of Fata’s patients had hired a patient advocate, they would not have become victims. There are tasks we do to help our clients that would have prevented harm once we were hired. 

See:  How Professional Patient Advocates Would Have Stopped Farid Fata

Then, last night, NBC’s Dateline took a more in-depth look at the case of Farid Fata, featuring interviews with a number of the patients he had treated, plus an interview with a nurse, Angela Swantek, who figured out what he was doing during a job interview three years before Farid was arrested. No, she didn’t take the job. Instead she blew him in – and the State of Michigan did nothing about it then. (I say KUDOs to her and a pox on the house of those people who decided not to investigate.)

What I learned during the Dateline interviews was that Continue Reading →

0
Page 5 of 12 «...34567...»