Help Us Assess the LoveFest!

Posted by:

Once upon a time, the word “advocate” was contentious: doctors didn’t want us in the room, nurses didn’t want us next to a hospital bed, and health insurers thought we patient advocates were nothing but troublemakers.

But in recent years there seems to have been a major shift in attitudes. I’m hoping you can help us assess that.

This point came up in several recent conversations with people who have been doing advocacy work for many years; who have been able to observe attitudes for quite awhile, and who tell me they have seen this shift with their own eyes.

The shift?  From wary standoffishness – to a lovefest! 

As follows:

Continue Reading →

2

Top 10 “Best Of” APHA Posts: 2017 in Review

Posted by:

As 2017 comes to a close, I thought it might be interesting to take a look at the blog posts you, my readers, considered to be most worth your reading time. Using post analytics, I’m able to see how many of you have read each of the 44 posts from 2017. Then, accommodating for the fact that some posts have been online for 11+ months, while others were just posted recently, it’s easy to tell which ones captured your imagination (or google’s search interest) to make the assessment.

So here are the top 10 posts (well – OK – I did have trouble counting again), in chronological order, the oldest to the newest:

Continue Reading →

0

Survey Says! The Results Are In

Posted by:

We privately paid, independent, professional patient advocates “tend to be older, white, female, more highly educated, and have other medical training or past careers in related professions.”

…. or at least that is one conclusion drawn by the surveyors — those who built, issued and analyzed the first National Health and Patient Advocate Survey.*

Both private, self-employed advocates, and employed advocates (hospitals, insurers, employers), were surveyed. Whether or not you were one of the folks who took the survey, if you have any interest in patient or health advocacy as a profession, you’ll be interested in the results.  They were issued June 30 – you can download the report from here.

But that’s not the best news from the results… The best news is…

(drumroll please!)

Continue Reading →

0

Gallimaufry: Your Questions, Some Answers, Media and Just Stuff

Posted by:

 

gallimaufryLast summer I came upon this great word – a word I had never heard before, but which can be used in so many aspects of conversation and life!  The word is “gallimaufry.”  It means a hodgepodge, a jumble, or confused medley of things – items, ideas, anything at all.

It’s a great word for an advocacy entrepreneur!  It describes the many ideas that come together to define challenges and create solutions, or the many activities it takes to achieve success, or even the creative approaches it takes to help our clients, or help each other.  I’ve even adopted the word for one section of my private blog.

And – it describes today’s post, which is a gallimaufry of information for you, inspired by a number of things:  current APHA activities, last week’s survey which asks you to help us determine topics and locations for our 2015 APHA advocacy business workshops, the time of year, current events – yes, a real hodgepodge, jumble or confused medley.  (Why not?)

So here you go – today’s gallimaufry:

Continue Reading →

0

Chutzpah! Know When It Crosses the Line

Posted by:

One of my favorite words:  Chutzpah!  Pronounced “hoots-pah.” A Yiddish word translated as “shameless audacity” or “supreme self-confidence,” as in (according to Merriam-Webster) “personal confidence or courage that allows someone to do or say things that may seem shocking to others.”

….  and sometimes a trait required by the most effective of health and patient advocates.

  • Do you have chutzpah?
  • And more importantly, do you know how and when to use it?

I ask this because I think there are appropriate times, and inappropriate times, when an advocate needs to showcase his or her chutzpah.  Lately I have experienced both, and I wonder how that translates to its use for clients.  I know some of you experience it, too.

Having chutzpah, and being able to use it, means you have enough confidence in what you are asking for that you believe you are entitled to, or possibly deserving of the outcome you request.

An example: your elderly client is in the hospital, sharing a room, and a single room comes open across the hall. You know your client would be much happier in that single room, so you ask to have him moved. Of course, they have already determined that someone else who is private pay is going to get that room, but you make the case (just enough of a stink) and ultimately your client finds himself alone in that single room.  Yes, you demonstrated your chutzpah. Now your client is happier.

Another client-related example might be when that same client gets the bill for that single hospital room, which wasn’t approved by Medicare, and for which you now argue with the billing department to have the extra charges removed from his bill.  After all, you believe it was crucial to his ability to heal.  And, oh, by the way, you’ll do your best to be sure he doesn’t need to return to the hospital within that 30 day window, meaning they won’t lose money on his readmission. <<wink wink>>

That’s chutzpah!  But – does it cross a line? Is it more like bribery? or blackmail?  or….  ?

That’s the big question.  Where is the line? And is it appropriate to cross it?

Continue Reading →

3
Page 1 of 5 12345