Don’t Let Your Cause Be the Cause of Lost Business

Posted by:

With the national presidential conventions behind us, and particularly if you live in a swing state, you know that the political campaigning, dressed as attacks and vitriol, is only revving up (as if it can get any worse?)

This presidential election will be the first one that social media – like Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter – will be used by the mainstream to share opinions and information.  Possibly for the first time, you’re going to learn what your friends and followers, and those you follow, think about which candidate – and why.  You’re going to learn more about them than you ever knew, and I guarantee that if you spend much time on social media, you’ll be surprised, and in some cases, disappointed or even shocked by the things some of them have to say.

Some will make snide little comments. Others will be downright nasty. You’ll agree with some. And sadly, there will be others who you will never like, or respect, again.

Continue Reading →

2

The Health Advocate’s Olympics

Posted by:

Like many of you, I have been glued to the Olympics for more than a week.  I stay up very late every night (and have to drag myself out of bed in the morning!) to watch athletes who can twist or turn or propel their bodies in ways that seem practically inhuman.  A mix of awe, pride, respect and, when it comes to Chinese badminton players, incredulity.

Watching the athletes and the competitions, I realized there are some metaphorical similarities between what they do, and what we, the pioneers of the profession of private health advocacy, are working to accomplish, as follows:

Continue Reading →

0

What’s a Bad Outcome? And Where Does the Fault Lie?

Posted by:

Scenario:

Joan, age 75, living in Ft. Lauderdale, was diagnosed with Stage IV Ovarian Cancer.  Joan’s daughter, Beth, who lives in Kansas, contacts Maxine, a private patient advocate and RN who works in Ft. Lauderdale, to help her mother.  Joan, Beth and Maxine have extensive conversations about the care Joan will need. The decision is made that Joan will need surgery and chemo.  Maxine is hired to oversee the care since Beth lives so far away.

The surgery goes well.  The hospital stay is typical. Joan is discharged from the hospital, but three days later begins to show signs of an infection at her incision location.  Sure enough, it’s a staph infection which is already running rampant through her body.  Joan dies less than a week later.

A bad outcome – no question about it.

And now Beth is furious, an emotion only heightened by her grief.  Further, Beth blames Maxine for the loss of her mother because, after all, Maxine is an RN, a private advocate, who was expected to make sure her mother came through her diagnosis, surgery and chemo so she could go on to lead a quality life for many years to come.

………………

This scenario is an extreme, I grant you.  But bear with me while you see how it influences every step you take, every conversation you have, as a private health advocate.

Continue Reading →

2

Setting New Standards for a New Profession – Your Chance to Help

Posted by:

As announced to AdvoConnection’s members last week, we have been working on a prescribed process for advocates who find it necessary to terminate their work with a client – in effect, to “divorce” that client, professionally, legally, and with the least amount of difficulty for both parties.  (Members will find access to that protocol in this coming week’s Monday Member Mail.)

One step in the process is the recommendation about sharing the notes you’ve kept with the client you’re divorcing, and the question about whether or not you, as the professional patient advocate, should be keeping those notes after you have terminated the relationship with the client, and if so, for what period of time.

(Please note – I’m talking about the notes and records YOU keep – not medical records which are being kept by their medical providers. You may choose to keep those, too – but here we focus only on your own notes.)

So that’s the question – how long, if at all, should private health advocates keep those notes?

Continue Reading →

3

Do I Have to Be a Nurse to Be a Patient Advocate?

Posted by:

The answer is simple.  No.

So why do I ask this question?  Earlier this month, while attending the NAHAC Conference, the question was asked by a number of people.  As if the qualification to be an effective patient advocate relied on a nursing education.

Now please don’t get me wrong.  I am a huge supporter of nurses and nursing, in its many important forms.  I’ve written many times at About.com about nurses, nurse practitioners, and why I believe training as a nurse is far more patient-centered than other forms of medical training.  Most of my commentary comes from my appreciation for the “whole patient” approach most nurses provide.  I’m a fan – a BIG fan – of nurses and the nursing model for patient care.

Here are five reasons why a patient advocate does not need to come from a nursing background:

1.  Patient advocates actually perform a number of services, many of which have nothing to do with nursing.  Some are medical bill reviewers, some do research and writing about medical problems…. Nursing isn’t the right background or training for these kinds of services.

2.  Patient advocates are facilitators, but they are not decision-makers.  Patient advocates do not perform medical functions.  They provide options and background information to their patients, but never make decisions on their patients’ behalf.  Since they aren’t making medical decisions, they don’t even need a medical background.  (Not to say a medical background wouldn’t be helpful.  It might be.  It just isn’t necessary.)

3.  No matter what the background of the patient advocate, he or she knows when it is time to find helpful resources to help his or her client.  If the advocate is a nurse, then she knows when to call in a doctor or an insurance expert.  If the advocate is not a nurse, then she knows when to call in a nurse if one is needed.  That means a patient advocate can have almost any type of background and experience…. He will simply set up his system of resource people accordingly.

4.  Patients who need an advocate’s help are all over the map when it comes to what they can afford.  Someone who is not a nurse, or does not have medical training, will charge less (or should charge less) in many instances than an advocate who does have nursing training, making him more affordable than someone who does have a nursing or medical education.

5.  Finally – to make my points – some of the best known and most effective patient advocates, real pioneers in our emerging business of patient advocacy, have no nursing experience or education in their background.  Ken Schueler, perhaps the premier patient advocate in the United States and abroad, does not have an MD or RN after his name. (He did study at Sarah Lawrence in its patient advocacy course.). Elisabeth Schuler Russell learned her skills while advocating for her baby daughter.

Smart advocates will find their training where they can, when they need it, for a particular reason.  For example, an advocate who decides to focus on cancer patients might take courses in understanding oncology.  Or an advocate who needs help understanding extensive medical terminology might take a course to better understand it.

All nurses are patient advocates.  But not all patient advocates need to be nurses to begin with.

If you are considering a career as a patient advocate, then start where you are planted.  But start.

……………………

Updates on this post:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Share your experience or join the conversation!

LEARN ABOUT APHA MEMBERSHIP | TWITTER | GOOGLE + | LINKED IN

6
Page 16 of 16 «...101213141516