Client Discussions: Where Do Spirituality and Religion Come In?

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My travels over the past two weeks have ultimately taken me to Florida where I’ll be staying for awhile to spend time with my dad.  It’s the latest in many, many visits, which I mention only because that means I have gotten to know many of Dad’s friends over the years, too. In fact, I’ve gotten to know a handful of them very well, so that I actually seek them out once I get here to be sure I have the opportunity to spend some time with them.

One such friend is a gentleman I’ll call Jim, who lives next door to Dad. A retired lawyer, Jim has now become a Eucharistic Minister who calls on many sick people and leads services on a Sunday morning.  He is well-respected and admired by so many, a man who balances his sense of fairness with his religion and spirituality. He puts a great deal of effort into making sure that anyone who would like to attend his services, regardless of their religious affiliation, is welcome to do so.

The three of us enjoyed brunch together today, and as it frequently does, the conversation turned to how life experiences were affected by our spirituality, the meshing (or repelling) of religion and politics, other people’s experiences as seen through a spiritual lens, and more…. Since Dad and Jim both live in a senior transitional-type community, where friends are often undergoing medical treatment, and where too many friends pass away, some of the discussion centered on healthcare and spirituality.

Midway through this morning’s conversation I realized (duh!) that perhaps spirituality is a topic advocates should be addressing with their clients. Considering the tendency of most human beings, whether or not they are religious (part of a specific religion), to turn to prayer and pastoral support when they are faced with a health crisis (their own, or a loved one’s), it seems that at least discussing spiritual needs with clients could be useful in at least three ways: Continue Reading →

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